We are pleased to announce the details of two upcoming lectures in our Erasmus Mundus distinguished lecture series. 

  • TitleHigh-Voltage Power Semiconductor Devices
  • Data/Time: Monday, May 9th, 2016 at 13:45
  • Place: Building 12, Room 270
  • Abstract: Approximately 10% of generated electricity is squandered due to losses in inefficient power conversion.  Eliminating this wasted energy is one of the best ways to reduce the world’s reliance on fossil fuels and decrease greenhouse gas emissions.  This seminar will briefly review the importance of high-voltage power semiconductor devices for achieving high-efficiency power conversion and minimizing wasted energy. Starting from some basic device physics concepts, the structure of the conventional silicon vertical power MOSFET will be reviewed and its limitations discussed.  This MOSFET structure and operation will be compared to that of the insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT).  Various techniques for improving the efficiency of MOSFET power devices will be presented – including lateral RESURF and vertical “Super-Junction” devices.  Looking to the future, the two most promising compound semiconductor devices will be reviewed.  The relative merits of GaN and SiC power devices will be compared to existing silicon devices, and we will discuss the most promising applications for these new devices.
  • TitleSilicon Valley  - Beginnings, Present and Future
  • Data/Time: Tuesday, May 10th, 2016 at 15:30
  • Place: Building 24, Room 102
  • Abstract: Silicon Valley - located just south of San Francisco, CA – has held a leadership role in the development of leading-edge technologies.   It is most widely known as the center of the Semiconductor revolution, the home of Apple & Cisco, and the head-quarters of world-leading Internet companies such as Google and Facebook.   Less well known is the “pre-history” of Silicon Valley – starting from vacuum tubes (valves) in the 1920s, measurement instruments in the 1930s, and radar in the 1940s and 1950s.  This lecture will present a summary of this “pre-history” in an attempt to answer how this small region came to dominate the development of so many new technologies.  Moving on to more recent history, the development and explosive growth of the major Semiconductor, Computer and Internet companies will be covered in more detail.  The role of local “venture capital” companies will be discussed, as well as more intangible attributes such as west-coast culture and critical mass. It’s hard to make predictions about the future of such a dynamic region, but we will try to identify some underlying trends and surprising recent developments.

Both lectures will be presented by Dr. Martin Manley, Senior Director of Technology Development, Power Integrations, San Jose CA.